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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 107 (some duplicates have been removed)
>> eric: we'll be keeping tabs on egypt. >> shannon bream is next, live in washington. >> reporter: fresh protests in egypt, as angry demonstrators clash with police for a third day, after president morsi claims that new rules all but exempt him from balances. the egyptian stock market falls amid fears of balance. i'm shannon bream, live in washington. america's news headquarters begins with the latest from cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who supp
headquarters. >> it's a move threatening to plunge egypt into the kind of turmoil not seen since the fall of former egyptian leader mubarek. protestors saying morsi has declared himself the new faro and they are calling for a change in egypt's ruling regime. steve hair again is live from kie rope. >> the number of protestors building once again behind me. the number of several,000. we have seen squirm michiganis through out t-- skirmishes toda. it has been a cat and mouse game through out the day with police charging and retreating to come back a short time later. they are using large concrete blocks to build walls and protecting government buildings as well. two things to keep an eye on. they say they will not go back to work until the president repeals his decree a decree that puts him beyond the reach of the court so it could shut down prosecutions across the country. the egyptian stock market plunged 10 percent today. such a dramatic plunge has not been seen since mubarek was over thrown one year ago. >> thank you very much for that live report from cairo. >> it has been nearly two ye
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
invasion as a very credible threat and that is done a lot to get the united states and egypt involved in the negotiations. the media work continues. the israelis have dropped leaflets over the gaza strip saying they are coming and prepared to invade and telling people to move to certain areas. at the same time hamaz is sending out text messages to israeli cell phones, specifically to the ones they think are linked to the army saying we will make gaza your graveyard. the tea leaves will finally be able to be read whenever hour for the cease-fire comes or we either have one or very shortly there after that ground offensive could start back to you. jenna: leland thank you so much. we'll talk a little bit about trouble we had at the u.s. embassy in tel-aviv today where a israeli man wielding a knife and an action attacked a security guard. they say the guard fired into the air and was only slightly injured. the suspect is now in custody. there are reports he had some mental health problems. police say political motives are not suspected at this time. jon: as we told you at the top of the
#% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federal level, and they trained 36,000 police. i think they need 150,000 or more than that. we have to go into judges, train the judges, the prosecutors. did you know that a prosecutor here in the united states, if
are scrambling to try to get israel and hamas to take a step back. egypt's prime minister and president arrived in gaza today. a planned cease-fire for the visit never materialized while president mohamed morsi made it clear whose side egypt is on. >> translator: we support the people of gaza. we are with them in their trenches. what hurts them hurts us. and the blood that flows from their children is our blood too. >> so most of the west, including the united states sides with israel. a nation now on the brink of staging a ground assault. israel's deputy foreign minister told cnn this morning that would trigger that move. >> if we will see in the next 24, 36 hours more rockets, launched at us, i think that would be the trigger. >> ben wedeman joins me now from the israel/gaza border. what are you seeing and hearing there now? >> reporter: it is a bit surreal here. we're in the city's marina right next to the yoko sushi restaurant. as you can see, there are people out, having dinner. seemingly to be living a normal life. but the owner of this restaurant did tell us just an hour ago they heard t
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
into israel and firing back on twitter, warning israel has "opened the gates of hell" on itself. egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel. in the meantime, the u.s. state department condemned the strikes fired from gaza and supporting israel's right to defend itself. i talked about all of this with sara sidner and also david kirkpatrick of the new york times and cnn's fareed zakaria. what is the latest on the attacks and the failout? >> what we are seeing are more rockets coming into israel. there have been dozens of air strikes as well since the killing of ahmed al jabari, the leader of hamas' military wing, but he is also one of the founders of hamas. we are talking about a huge blow to hamas, and now the government there in gaza. israel is also telling us, and we are just hearing this from the military spokesperson that they are bringing in reservists, but they are consider iing a ground war, but they have not yet given the go ahead for that, but they are preparing. we know that they have been firing with the air with the air strikes, but we also know that they have been firing from
identities. the fact that in egypt, the first thing they say is raise your head, you are an ejection, meaning be proud. so the question then is what happened? if this was true for a decade. there was nothing particularly unique about 2007 or 2011. whether there was a major economic crisis in egypt or tunisia. it was extraordinary and i don't think you can just blame it on economics. so the question is why didn't they do it before? i think we have the right answer. political sponsors have always assumed that it is not enough to have angry people to revolt. you have to organize and you have to get a lot of people through the streets and the government has to feel the heat. the fact you have a lot of angry people doesn't quite make it. governments understood that you can can't get people to the streets about organizing. the outline political parties. they kept tabs on social institutions. they put leaders in prison that challenge them. and they were under control. that is why some people are with us for the long haul. what happened over the last couple of years, we have been watching for a decad
to the far east speaking air force one with leaders from israel and egypt and turkey in a scramble to avoid further escalation of the violence. i welcome israel's counsel general and will israel invade gaza in >> the man date that the israel defense forces receive from the israeli government is remove the threat that is it a magnitude. and thousands of rockets that threaten and paralyze life in our count southerp region. the government gave a man date to remove and thatthis is not limited in time or in scope. it is it certainly a possibility and at this stage of the game we don't know yet. >> gaza is one of the defensest populated places. there will be more civilian casulties and don't worry about international pressure on israel. >> we enjoy legitimacy. the president of the united states expressed support in israel's right to arm itself. but we are concerned about innocent people being harmed because of the military action. and the government instructed it to minimize it as humanly possible the loss of life and damage to proper. >> i know that. and i know that israel always does that. and
, beginning with the political crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentati
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
gay people straight. she'll join me next. >>> plus, as egypt's president comes under fire, president morsi speaks out about president obama. speaking live with someone that just interviewed morsi, don't miss this. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. >>> now to egypt. several new developments today. first off, dmon straights prompted the u.s. to shut down the embassy there. the embassy was not under fire but clashes between protesters and riot police clogged streets around the complex. this chaos is going on for days as demonstrators threatened the new islamic president morsi with a second revolution. >>> and then there's this. lawmakers dominated by islamists are now rushing to draft a new constitution. this move is seen by some of morsi's critics as an effort by the muslim brotherhood to hijack the constitution. and amid all of this, president morsi is on the cover of "time" magazine. "time" calls him the most important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credi
that the spring is beneficial, we see that in egypt, this is not necessarily the case. the muslim brotherhood in egypt, the sunni islam that party with different views of regional policy. the egyptian president was in tehran recently for the non-aligned movement meeting and there is a lot of worry at him going to tehran would indicate that iran was isolated as the u.s. had imagined it to be or wanted it to be. more see meeting with iran officials indicated iran is an important regional player. of course what did morrissey during undreamed due? he criticized the regime of bashar al-assad and implicitly criticized the regime for his support of syria. this was an embarrassment for the iranian leadership, to the point that they change translation on television. he criticized syria and every man television set by rain. so trying to save face basically. but we've seen that egypt is not necessarily going to follow iran's policies in the region. in fact, the egyptians have kept their distance from tehran. they have not resumed relations in this a lot of tension in some issues. in addition, turkey eme
spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing on national security challenges facing the united states. he said the top priority should be getting
the last few days about how the nation of egypt is really the key connection for the united states to both sides in the fight right now. and that was driven home today by the fact that when the cease-fire was announced, it was announced by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and egypt's foreign minister at a press conference in egypt. >> in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. ultimately, every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya hyan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recommendation to give the egyptian cease-fir
of egypt, turkey and qatar, all met, all have varying degrees of influence over hamas, they are trying to broker some type of sees fire. egyptian president said when the meeting was over, they took a break, quoting him, some in of a cease-fire but nothing concrete. it looks like there's a possibility, still, a long way to go. >> harris: very interesting about egypt we'll be talking later inside the fox report about their role in this. the muslim brotherhood has aligned itself with the palestinians in this conflict. let's talk about what might make a sees fire a reality? >> reporter: as -- a cease-fire a reality? >> reporter: there could be a ground incursion"z. currents wht israel wants to make a cease-fire reality is for hamas to stop the rocket attacks that are being launched from gaza. rocket attack fast that hamas is responsible for as well as militant groups. hamas says they want israel to stop so-called targeted assassinations. both groups come to the take with something they want. how much of it is reality they are going to achieve a temporary cease-fire? very uncertain. a few d
speaking today from air force one with leaders from israel,ro egypt, and turkey in a scramble to avoid further escalation of the violence. so let me welcome israel's council general in new york andc ask the ambassador now will israel invade gaza? >> well, the mandate that the israel defense forces we see from the israeli government is to remove the threat that w will be of strategic rockets. it a threatens life in our southern region. the government gave a mandate to remove that strategic threat. this mandate is not limited in time or scope. it's search a possibility, and obviously at this stage of the game we don't know yet. >> gaza, one of the most densely populated areas on earth, inevitably there will be more civilian b casualties. don't you worry about international pressure on israel. >> well, right now we enjoy a large degree of international le jet mlegitlegitimacy. the president expressed his support about e israel's right d need to defend itself. however, we are very concerned with the possibility of nbt innt people being harmed as a result of our action. the government instr
. >> let me ask you, what's your reaction to egypt's prime minister's role in this very difficult stand-off knowing that the muslim brotherhood dominates the egyptian government right now? >> i think the egyptian must decide, must take a stand. in one hand, they come to you, to the u.s. and to europe and ask for a lot of money. on the other hand, they endorse the hamas. only yesterday prime minister of egypt came to gaza. he did not condemn the attacks on the israeli civilian population. they think egypt must take a hold here and to tell the hamas, if you want the backing of egypt, stop fighting. stop shooting missiles into israel much it is very clear. we do not know what the hamas wants. we have no sentiment in gaza today. no occupation, no blame game. why they are doing it? it is pure hatred against jews who live in israel and we are expect egypt to take a different role. >> i've been following prime minister netanyahu's messages on twitter over the past 24 hours. and he's been writing that the terrorists are committing what he calls double war crimes. they fire at three civilians an
issue is egypt, they are supporting the palestinian tph-s this matter. we are looking at the results of the arab spring. jon: egypt now run by the muslim brotherhood of which hamas is an offshoot. >> that's right. morisi has come out in support of the palestinians. even though the rocket attacks, this violence was initiated by the palestinians. you have the camp david aeu koerbgsdz thaccords, the arab spring. the middle east is a mess. look in iran the centrifuges are still spinning. secretary panetta, and secretary clinton are in asia right now. that pivot, are we pivoting away from the challenges and our interests in the middle east, which is really a mess. jon: you worry we are leaving the israelis high and dry on this one? >> it could be. i don't know exactly what is going on with the administration. they have mad said some of the right things in sue mort of supporting israel. we are reaping the fruits of our labors in the middle east. and our policies in the middle east has been a real failure. if we are shipping through the pacific where are we going to have the planes and tank
on the states because it's been a very fascinating story. egypt is still going through a revolution, halt asserted -- hasn't asserted itself, needs help from the rest of the world particularly economically. it can't be as assertive and play a role. iraq is not really fully integrated into the arab world left. what does that leave? syria is in trouble. that leaves the gulf cooperate council state led by saudi arabia. so what we have now is a coalition state, the gulf cooperation council around saudi arabia that invited two other states into the royal club, jordan and morocco, to broaden the gcc in exchange for economic and security cooperation going in different directions, and that is the coalition right now that is the powerful coalition in the arab world. and the states that are going through change are somewhat marginalized, there's no one else is so if you want to call that unity, go ahead. that's what we have. >> that's a problem. egypt will come back. >> it'll come back. >> and soon. >> and then in terms of identity politics, you get to a country like libya, you add the tribal -- >>
a lot right now, and that is egypt that's taking a very firm stance, calling this an israeli aggression. but one of the interesting things that tony blair, the former british prime minister said, he said of course, right now everybody is on the phone, everybody is trying to negotiate, everybody is trying to bring the violence to an end. but at this point in time it certainly looks very much as though things are escalating rather than deescalating and that is certainly the message that we are getting from the israeli defense forces. >> fred pleitgen, thank you very much indeed. >>> joining me is the israeli ambassador to the u.n. welcome to you, sir. >> thank you. good evening. >> this is a dangerous situation, isn't it. what is your reading of what is happening on the ground? we're hearing tonight of 2,000 troops being moved, israeli troops, maybe 30,000 others being brought up as well. what are you hearing and what is the plan? >> well, i won't get into military operations but it has to be very, very clear. israel and israel's government will do anything it takes to protect its citizen
, president mubarak, out of leadership in egypt, there was -- they were assisting in creating instability around our other ally israel, and that instability continues to grow. one of the things that was helpful from egypt while president mubarak was in charge, at least there was some effort to restrict the transfer of rockets into the gaza strip. so there were some tunnels that would be found, the tunnels had to be kept small so they were able to get smaller rockets into gaza. but now that there's a new regime, apparently the bigger rockets are getting in to gaza and they pose more and more of a threat as they continue to be fired into israel. the action is not only the fall of an ally, president mubarak, but the assistance in bringing to power in egypt the muslim brotherhood. they want to see israel gone and they would also not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we ta
is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our panelists talked about the situation right now, especially in syria. but what if scenarios, and their recommendation and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today have their year on the ground. y are constituencies there ar people whose opinions are sought. i would like to introduce a membe
. not everyone can be a foster parent, but anyone can help a foster child. jeans. >> in egypt the birth place of the arab spring, once again egyptian protest trying to hold on to democracy. people there angry over president morsi power grab. alex was on the scene today in cairo. >>reporter: birth place of egypt revolution. today once again rippinging with calls to the did you know fall of a dictator. this time it's for this man. president mohammad morsi whom america rae lies on to be a regional peace broker but last week he granted himself unchecked power. him if leaving to bloody clashes. the crowd is planting leave. these are the seam chant 2 years ago during the refuse lugs except that they have substituted mubarak for morsi. the egyptian topple president mubarak. dictator who ruled for 3 decade. they then held a historic election. voted in the new president. now fichlt he's like a super power. >>reporter: the office says the move is just temporary. side lined remnant of the era app put he script on the right track. it's far from within who will win the show did you know but c
there are major developments to tell you about in egypt. new protests breaking out after egyptian president mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt.
type into the search engine the word egypt, and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on. every time we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gathering information. we are giving information about what we buy, about what we like, about what our political bias sees maybe -- biases may be, and you and i ought to get the same information if we tie in the same word. that is kind of scary. >> somebody is making up their mind about what we want. >> it is not somebody. it is a series of 0s and 1s. it is a computer algorithm. >> the algorithm is fine, and i understand it exists, and i will salute it. is there, but i want to know what that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers some say -- something? who is going to cover a war? who is going to cover a campaign? without the journalists doing on is information gathering, all this stuff is below it. >> there are plenty of people who are going to do gathering, but the key word -- >> that is not true. there are fewer reporters covering the war in afghanistan then ther
, fearing it could draw egypt in to that consulate. and joining us the consulate general, good to see you ambassador. >> thank you for having me. >> dave: the latest what we just said. benjamin netanyahu told the cabinet he's ready to significantly be expand its operation in gaza. is israel prepared for a ground invasion into gaza and what could incite that? >> look the mandate from the inception was to remove this strategic threat posed by thousands of rockets on israelis-- innocent israelis paralyzing our entire southern region. so the goal was to remove that threat and the mandate given to the defense forces from the government was not limited in time nor in scope. so in other words, the possibility of israel moving in with ground forces certainly exists, it depends how the operation develops on the ground. right now, hamas is firing rockets. hamas is still displaying a tremendous degree of aggression towards israel and the purpose of this operation is to eliminate that threat. >> more than 1100 rockets have been launched from gaza into israel in this year alone. just this morning, i r
from iran that it basically needs to provoke the muslim brotherhood in egypt to be more supportive of it. perhaps it's iran wanting to deflect attention from syria. perhaps it's an effort by hamas to in effect bridle its credentials to prove to the palestinians on the west bank that its route is the best way to deal with israel. >> while britain and germany have both said hamas bears the brunt of the blame, mohamed morsi appears to lay some blame on the israelis. is he torn with his fellow islamists and the need to maintain the treaty obligations with israel? >> martin, if he isn't yet, he could be soon, and that's, of course, the real danger here. if this thing goes on just for a short time, then maybe we wind up okay. but if it goes on for days or weeks, like the 2008-2009 war that ambassador ginsberg referred to, then i think all bets are off as to just how long the egyptian regime can really sustain this stance of sort of being between the two. you know, in a broader sense, of course, the cease-fire that hamas had respected for a number of years never reflected a fundamental st
years. you've had dramatic circumstances in egypt and libya and tunisia. they're working on syria. you could point to examples in borrow ran, for example, that's not moving as fast. part of the obama philosophy is very -- which is very interesting is trying to find what is possible in this area that does not get america caught in the trap of unnecessary war, repetition of quagmire. you have two examples of egypt and libya which are most striking. people on the streets clear my opposition to the dictator there. there are plenty of examples, for example, bush in tan man square. -- ton man square. -- tiananmen square. there's lots of examples where we tell folks -- bush sr. and iraq telling saddam if you want to crack down the shia, so be it . and because of that factor, that's one of the key factors that got them pushed out. libya was a different story where you have the possibility of a massacre occurring and obama said i would like to stop that from happening, very much so. but if i can't get a true blue international coalition through the u.n., then i might not do it. >> how about a t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 107 (some duplicates have been removed)